Portland art blog + news + exhibition reviews + galleries + contemporary northwest art

recent entries

Lectures
Bridge Design Panel
Todd Johnson at PNCA
Politics & Community
Tuesday Links
The Butterfly Effect
Vito Acconci at the Nevada Art Museum's Art + Environment Conference
Goings On
Pointy
Andrea Zittel follow-up
Calling Artists & Curators
Models of Critical Production

recent comments

categories

 

Calls for Artists
Design Review
Essays
Interviews
News
Openings & Events
Photoblogs
Reviews
Video
Links
About PORT

regular contributors

 

Amy Bernstein
Katherine Bovee
Arcy Douglass
Megan Driscoll
Sarah Henderson
Jeff Jahn
Jenene Nagy
Ryan Pierce

archives

 

Guest Contributors
Past Contributors
October 2008
September 2008
August 2008
July 2008
June 2008
May 2008
April 2008
March 2008
February 2008
January 2008
December 2007
November 2007
October 2007
September 2007
August 2007
July 2007
June 2007
May 2007
April 2007
March 2007
February 2007
January 2007
December 2006
November 2006
October 2006
September 2006
August 2006
July 2006
June 2006
May 2006
April 2006
March 2006
February 2006
January 2006
December 2005
November 2005
October 2005
September 2005
August 2005
July 2005
June 2005

contact us

 

Contact us

search

 


syndicate

 

Atom
RSS

powered by

 

Movable Type 3.16

This site is licensed under a

 

Creative Commons License

Thursday 11.01.07

« Showing This Weekend | Main | Portland Art Center at a crossroads »

PORT's Bridge Design Contest

ZGFbridge1.jpg
Proposed pedestrian and light rail bridge as designed by ZGF

>oldenburg_clothespin.jpg
Oldenberg (1976)

Here's a chance for budding designers, architects and well... armchair architects. We have discussed this previously on PORT but most of the design conscious people in Portland who saw the rather preliminary image for the new pedestrian, cycle and light rail bridge just south of the hideous looking Marquam Bridge by ZGF were pretty unimpressed. To be fair to ZGF, its just a preliminary, on the other hand it's top heavy and very static "clothespin" form almost seemed like a Claes Oldenberg.

In the spirit of better design, PORT is going to have a lil contest so y'all can give it your best shot. You can even choose to use this high-res image (courtesy of Brad Carlyle) if you want.

Rules are simple:

Email jpeg's to me at jeff At portlandart Dot net by December 21st and we will post images of everything that stands out. Highly conceptual, impossible to build ideas, such as a bridge made of banana peels or Vera Katz statues are fine, though if it gets built you are going to be the first to use it and answer the angry mob at the other end. Anyone can enter, prizes will be as conceptual as the designs.

350px-Erasmusbrug.jpg
Erasmus Bridge, Rotterdam and way better than the ZGF clunker

Some major design issues to keep in mind are the terrifically ugly Marquam Bridge just to the north and the sleek and modern South Waterfront with its aerial tram which forms its western terminus.

Personally, I like ideas like the Nescio bridge in the Netherlands (though it isn't architecturally assertive enough for this site) and the ultra assertive Erasmus bridge in Rotterdam, which seems a bit much for our setting since Mt hood will make anything like that look like human vanity. Of course Calatrava is a name that has to be brought up here but I'd like to see something like what Denton Corker Marshall did with the Webb Bridge, though this needs to accommodate light rail so it needs requires a beefier solution than a single use pedestrian crossing.

Portland with its great collection of bridges deserves an excellent design, not merely a contemporary looking design.

Posted by Jeff Jahn on November 01, 2007 at 0:00 | Comments (0)


Comments

Post a comment

Thanks for signing in, . Now you can comment. (sign out)

(If you haven't left a comment here before, you may need to be approved by the site owner before your comment will appear. Until then, it won't appear on the entry. Thanks for waiting.)


Remember me?


s p o n s o r s
Site Design: Jennifer Armbrust   •   Site Development: Philippe Blanc & Katherine Bovee